Wednesday, November 22, 2006

The Words "Kike" and "Anti-Semite" Were Both Coined by Racist Jews, Who Hated Other Jews

Christopher Jon Bjerknes

http://www.jewishracism.com

The term "Kike" was coined by racist German Jews, who hated the Ostjuden who flooded into America after the Russians opened up the Pale of Settlement in 1881, which is to say after Jews murdered the Czar and encouraged and orchestrated pogroms,

"It was I. M. Wise, typically, who broke the silence of the established Jews as they saw what was happening to the good name of their faith. From the fresh air of Cincinnati, Wise observed the noisy, smelly scenes in the eastern seaports and was revolted. 'It is next to an impossibility to associate or identify ourselves with that half-civilized orthodoxy which constitutes the bulk of the [Jewish] population in those cities,' he stormed. 'We are Americans and they are not. We are Israelites of the nineteenth century and a free country, and they gnaw the dead bones of past centuries.' Wise was never a man to mince words. 'The good reputation of Judaism must naturally suffer materially, which must without fail lower our social status.' The prosperous 'Uptown' Jew of New York found identification with the unsavory 'Downtown' Jew dangerous in the extreme. It was in the Uptown salons of the German-Jewish aristocracy that the word 'kike' first appeared, to deride the uncultured and unclean immigrants. Yet the emotional dilemma was acute, for the Uptown Jew was not without a sense of obligation and guilt."—Peter Grose, Israel in the Mind of America, Alfred A. Knopf, New York, (1983), pp. 31-32.

The term "anti-semite" was coined by a crypto-Jew named Wilhelm Marr,

"The word [Anti-Semitism] was probably first used by Wilhelm Marr, said to have been a converted Jew, in Der Sieg des Judentums ueber das Germanentum, a pamphlet which he published in 1879, the same year in which he founded the Anti-Semitic League; two years later he began publication of Zwanglose antisemitische Hefte."—"ANTI-SEMITISM", The Universal Jewish Encyclopedia, Volume 1, The Universal Jewish Encyclopedia, Inc., New York, (1939), pp. 341-409, at 341.