Sunday, December 03, 2006

The Racist Jewish Attitude Towards Those Whose Work Albert Einstein Plagiarized

Christopher Jon Bjerknes

I believe Albert Einstein was motivated by his racism to steal from Gentiles and to refuse to give them adequate credit for their work. In addition to his hatred for his first wife for being a Gentile, Einstein believed, due to his racism, that he was entitled to steal from her. Jews have long taught that a good Jew never speaks out against another Jew, and a good Jews does not praise a Gentile unless such praise results in even greater praise for a Jew. We sometimes see Jews deigning to give mild and grudging praise to Hendrik Antoon Lorentz and Jules Henri Poincare, or to Mileva Maric; but it is almost always so that they can lavish far greater praise on an undeserving Jew, Albert Einstein. Leviticus 19:17-8 states,

"17 Thou shalt not hate thy brother in thine heart: thou shalt in any wise rebuke thy neighbour, and not suffer sin upon him. 18 Thou shalt not avenge, nor bear any grudge against the children of thy people, but thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself: I am the LORD."

In this admonition, "neighbor" refers only to fellow Jews. Jews are also taught to cover up the sins of fellow Jews, lest the tribe suffer as a whole. Numbers 16:22 states,

"And they fell upon their faces, and said, O God, the God of the spirits of all flesh, shall one man sin, and wilt thou be wroth with all the congregation?"

Israel Shahak wrote in his book Jewish History, Jewish Religion: The Weight of Three Thousand Years,

"There is also a series of rules forbidding any expression of praise for Gentiles or for their deeds, except where such praise implies an even greater praise of Jews and things Jewish. This rule is still observed by Orthodox Jews. For example, the writer Agnon, when interviewed on the Israeli radio upon his return from Stockholm, where he received the Nobel Prize for literature, praised the Swedish Academy, but hastened to add: 'I am not forgetting that it is forbidden to praise Gentiles, but here there is a special reason for my praise'—that is, that they awarded the prize to a Jew."—I. Shahak, Jewish History, Jewish Religion: The Weight of Three Thousand Years, Pluto Press, London, (1997/2002), p. 93.

Rev. I. B. Pranaitis wrote in his book The Talmud Unmasked: The Secret Rabbinical Teachings Concerning Christians, Eugene Nelson Sanctuary, New York, (1939),

"In Abhodah Zarah (20, a, Toseph) it says:

'Do not say anything in praise of them, lest it be said: How good that Goi is!'[Footnote: Maimonides (in Hilkhoth Akum X, 5) adds: 'Moreover, you should seek opportunity to mix with them and find out about their evil doings.']

In this way they explain the words of Deuteronomy (VII, 2) . . . and thou shalt show no mercy unto them [Goim], as cited in the Gemarah. Rabbi S. Iarchi explains this Bible passage as follows:

'Do not pay them any compliments; for it is forbidden to say: how good that Goi is.'

In Iore Dea (151,14) it says:

'No one is allowed to praise them or to say how good an Akum is. How much less to praise what they do or to recount anything about them which would redound to their glory. If, however, while praising them you intend to give glory to God, namely, because he has created comely creatures, then it is allowed to do so.'"—English translation of I. B. Pranaitis, Christianus in Talmude Iudaeorum sive, Rabbinicae doctrinae de Christianis secreta: quae patere fecit, Officina Typographica Academiae Caesarae Scientiarum, Petropoli, (1892).

The Jewish book of Deuteronomy 2:7 states,

"And when the LORD thy God shall deliver them before thee; thou shalt smite them, and utterly destroy them; thou shalt make no covenant with them, nor shew mercy unto them:"