Tuesday, April 10, 2007

Was Albert Einstein an Incestuous Rapist?

Christopher Jon Bjerknes

http://www.jewishracism.com

Albert Einstein took for his second wife his cousin Elsa Einstein, with whom he was a blood relative through both his mother and his father. We know that Albert Einstein desired to have sex with, and marry, his eventual second wife Elsa's daughter, Ilse, or her sister, Margot.[1] His second wife's daughter Ilse was disgusted by Albert Einstein's sexual advances towards her,[1] such that if Albert Einstein did indeed have sex with his wife's daughters, it is likely that this occurred, at least initially, as an act, or acts, of incestuous rape.

Albert Einstein referred to his wife Elsa, and her daughters Ilse and Margot, as his "small harem".[2] Albert Einstein was often seen with, and frequently lived with, his wife and cousin's daughters.[3] Albert Einstein often cheated on both his first and second wives—he admitted that he cheated on his first wife for years with his second wife, who was also his cousin, while still married to his first wife. Some suspect he had an affair with his cousin and wife Elsa's sister, Paula.[4]

Einstein's Violent and Perverse Nature

and

Einstein's Lack of Character.

Some suspect that Albert Einstein was a syphilitic and a whore monger.[5] We know that Albert Einstein was sadistically cruel to both of his wives.[6] From childhood onwards, Albert Einstein often exhibited the behavior of a ruthless and violent psychopath.[7] Albert was a misogynist. He may have beaten his first wife Mileva Maric,[8] and his son Hans Albert claimed that Albert Einstein beat him.[9] We know that Albert Einstein was also a virulent racist, and a segregationist, who advocated the collective punishment and genocide of the Germans and the ruin of the Europeans.[10] In addition, Einstein was a career plagiarist, who betrayed the trust of his colleagues and friends, including Mileva Maric, Marcel Grossmann, David Hilbert, and Kamerlingh Onnes, among others, and stole credit for their work.

Barring the discovery of new evidence, it cannot be stated with any certainty that Albert Einstein raped his wife's daughters, but we know that he had the desire and the opportunity to fornicate with them, and that Isle, at least, was repulsed by his sexual advances towards her. Given the fact that Albert Einstein referred to these women as his "harem", as well as the other circumstances surrounding their relationship, it is a distinct possibility that Albert Einstein forced himself on these young women.

1. D. Overbye, Einstein in Love: A Scientific Romance, Viking, New York, (2000), pp. 343, 404, note 22. A. Einstein to Ilse Einstein, The Collected Papers of Albert Einstein, Volume 8, Document 536, Princeton University Press, (1998); and Ilse Einstein to Georg Nikolai, The Collected Papers of Albert Einstein, Volume 8, Document 545, Princeton University Press, (1998).

2. A. Einstein quoted in M. Born, The Born-Einstein Letters, Walker and Company, New York, (1971), p. 8.

3. See, for example, D. K. Buchwald, et al., Editors, The Collected Papers of Albert Einstein, Volume 7, Princeton University Press, (2002), p. 106. 4. R. Highfield and P. Carter, The Private Lives of Albert Einstein, St. Martin’s Press, New York, (1993), p. 148. 5. M. Zackheim, Einstein's Daughter, the Search for Lieserl, Riverhead Books, Penguin Putnam, New York, (1999), p. 244.

6. As but example of many to be had, see: "Deposition in Divorce Proceedings", English translation by A. M. Hentschel, The Collected Papers of Albert Einstein, Volume 8, Document 676, Princeton University Press, (1998), p. 713. See also: M. Zackheim, Einstein's Daughter, the Search for Lieserl, Riverhead Books, Penguin Putnam, New York, (1999), pp. 78-79.

7. As but one example among many to be had, consider: M. Winteler-Einstein, English translation by A. Beck, "Albert Einstein—A Biographical Sketch", The Collected Papers of Albert Einstein, Volume 1, Princeton University Press, (1987), pp. xv-xxii, at xviii.

8. R. Highfield and P. Carter, The Private Lives of Albert Einstein, St. Martin's Press, New York, (1993), pp. 153-154.

9. G. J. Whitrow, Editor, Einstein: The Man and his Achievement, Dover, New York, (1967), p. 21.

10. A. Einstein, "To the Heroes of the Battle of the Warsaw Ghetto", Bulletin of the Society of Polish Jews, New York, (1944), reprinted in Ideas and Opinions, Crown, New York, (1954), pp. 212-213. A. Einstein, quoted in O. Nathan and H. Norton, Einstein on Peace, Avenel Books, New York, (1981), p. 331. A. Einstein quoted in A. Foelsing, Albert Einstein: A Biography, Viking, New York, (1997), pp. 727-728. M. Born, The Born-Einstein Letters, Walker and Company, New York, (1971), pp. 189, 199.