Saturday, April 12, 2014

Soviet Union War Propaganda Posters in the Home of Claire Shipman and White House Press Secretary Jay Carney

From Jewish Racism
From Jewish Racism

Christopher Jon Bjerknes

An article in notes that White House Press Secretary Jay Carney had at least the above two Soviet Union war propaganda posters prominently displayed in his home:

These posters appeared in photographs taken of Carney's kitchen in an article by Alicia C. Shephard, "Balancing Act: In the constant juggle of managing life at home and life at work, Claire Shipman realizes that confidence is key", Washintonian Mom, which states, among other relevant facts, "Carney and Shipman met in Moscow in the early 1990s when he was writing for Time and she was reporting for CNN":

In 1987, Carney received his BA degree from Yale University in Russian and Eastern European Studies. In a 12 June 1996 article for People, "Soviet Union", Michelle Green writes of Shipman:

"Raised in the Midwest, Hurst and Shipman each chose journalism as a route to the Soviet Union. The older of two children of insurance-company manager Charles Hurst and his wife, Mary, Steve wed high school sweetheart Kathy Beaman while both were at Millikin College in Illinois. As seniors, they spent a semester in Budapest and became fascinated with Eastern Europe. After a three-year stint with the Decatur Herald-Review, Hurst entered the graduate program of Russian and East European Studies at the University of Illinois. Landing a job with AP in Columbus, Ohio, in 1976, he lobbied until he was sent to Moscow three years later.

Shipman's passion for the Soviet Union was sparked in 1985 when, as a Columbia University senior, she spent a summer studying Russian in St. Petersburg. Raised in Columbus, the older daughter of Morgan Shipman, a law professor at Ohio State, and his wife, Christie, she had welcomed the adventure. Her mother, who suffered from Guillain-BarrĂ© syndrome, had died in 1983, and Claire's grief was still fresh. 'Gorbachev had just come to power, and it was still the Soviet Union—intimidating and intriguing,' she says."