Saturday, February 13, 2016

Gravitational Waves: Separating Fact from Fiction

Christopher Jon Bjerknes

I do not have time at the moment to search out all the original sources of Einstein's theory of gravitational waves beyond citing his papers of 1916 and 1918.[1] Einstein did not believe that gravitational waves exist and he rejected Karl Schwarzschild's formalization of and belief in black holes.[2]

The theory of gravitational waves and their supposed recent detection are based upon Paul Gerber's proposal in 1898 that gravitational forces propagate at the speed of light,[3] David Hilbert's generally covariant gravitational field equations of the general theory of relativity of 1915,[4] and Karl Schwarzschild's solution of the Schwarzschild radius of 1916.[2]

I will wait for a broader analysis and independent verification of the recent findings before commenting on the validity of the assumptions which underlie the researchers' interpretations of the reported data. Suffice it to say that much hype is being made of very little evidence. No one has ever isolated "space-time" in a laboratory, and it is a metaphysical and not a scientific concept. A fourth perpendicular line cannot be drawn relative to the three axes of space, and since space-time does not and cannot exist in physical reality, there are no waves in it beyond human abstract images of it. The broader history of space-time theories, which theories Einstein initially rejected, and which theories predate his own by thousands of years, is given in my new book SPACE-THEORIES BEFORE EINSTEIN.

It is Poincare, Marcolongo, Hargreaves and Minkowski who deserve mention for the introduction and mathematical formalisms of the concept of space-time in the theory of relativity, not Einstein who initially rejected them.

Since the press is hyping these reports as if tremendously significant, just as it did the 1919 eclipse observations, why are they not emphasizing the contributions of Riemann, Gerber, Poincare, Marcolongo, Minkowski, Hargreaves, Hilbert and Schwarzschild, rather than Einstein who rejected the notion of space-time, then rejected the notion of gravitational waves in space-time?

All of this hype is not about promoting some wonderful scientific discovery that will change our lives for the better, no such event took place. Rather, it is about promoting Einstein and the jews. The jews have a religious maxim which states, "Never praise a Goy!" They follow it religiously as they hype Einstein shamelessly.

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1). A. Einstein, "Über Gravitationswellen", Sitzungsberichte der Königlich Preussischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, (1918), pp. 154-167; and "Näherungsweise Integration der Feldgleichungen der Gravitation", Sitzungsberichte der Königlich Preussischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, (1916), pp. 688-696.

2). K. Schwarzschild, "Über das Gravitationsfeld eines Massenpunktes nach der Einsteinschen Theorie", Sitzungsberichte der Deutschen Akademie der Wissenschaften zu Berlin, Klasse fur Mathematik, Physik, und Technik, (1916), pp. 189-196; and "Über das Gravitationsfeld einer Kugel aus inkompressibler Flussigkeit nach der Einsteinschen Theorie", Sitzungsberichte der Deutschen Akademie der Wissenschaften zu Berlin, Klasse fur Mathematik, Physik, und Technik, (1916), pp. 424-434.

3). P. Gerber, "Die räumliche und zeitliche Ausbreitung der Gravitation", Zeitschrift für Mathematik und Physik, Leipzig, Volume 43, (1898), pp. 93-104; and Die Fortpflanzungsgeschwindigkeit der Gravitation, Programmabhandlung des städtischen Realgymnasiums zu Stargard in Pommerania, (1902); reprinted "Die Fortpflanzungsgeschwindigkeit der Gravitation", Annalen der Physik, Series 4, Volume 52, (1917), pp. 415-441.

4). D. Hilbert, "Die Grundlagen der Physik, (Erste Mitteilung.) Vorgelegt in der Sitzung vom 20. November 1915.", Nachrichten von der Königlichen Gesellschaft der Wissenschaften zu Göttingen. Mathematisch-physikalische Klasse, (1915), pp. 395-407. Hilbert followed this article with: "Die Grundlagen der Physik, (Zweite Mitteilung.)", Nachrichten von der Königlichen Gesellschaft der Wissenschaften zu Göttingen. Mathematisch-physikalische Klasse, (1917), pp. 53-76; and "Die Grundlagen der Physik", Mathematische Annalen, Volume 92, (1924), pp. 1-32.